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The Bible in the Arian Catholic Church

As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be...

The Gospel of Thomas

The Universal Bible Project
Sponsored by the Arian Catholic Church - developing the most complete and accurate Bible from all the available manuscript families

We are currently gathering the resources to be able to arrange for an unbiased Universal Bible to be printed. This Bible will NOT contain either an Arian or a trinitarian bias, it will strive to provide the most accurate translation possible, it will compare all the principle manuscripts in parallel where they differ, and present all the available books that the ancient scribes and fathers also referred to, including the Pseudepigrapha, Apocrypha, Tanakh, New Testament and NT Apocrypha which will be presented in the form of three volumes. This is an expensive undertaking and will require much organisation and will be several years in the making, as soon as this is ready we will be advertising this Bible from this site. Meanwhile we would gratefully accept donations to our Bible fund to assist us.

With so many bibles around claiming to be the most accurate translations and with there being so much controversy over certain bibles and the canonicity of certain books within the bible it is important to know which bible we should trust. Bearing in mind that there are believed to be over 1,000 actual errors in the NT scriptures themselves, in excess of 20,000 translational errors in the early bibles, and the earliest manuscripts were the result of many redactions and transcripts, it is important to be presented with accurate translated transcripts of as much of the original texts as possible in the form that was intended.

In lieu of the Universal Bible we recommend six bibles, the first four largely represent accurate translations from the five principle manuscript families and are highly recommended, the last two are recommended as comparison texts from earlier translations of the Byzantine text and Latin Vulgate; together with the New Testament Apocrypha and the Pseudepigrapha (with the Books of Enoch) they provide the most accurate translations and complete coverage of all the manuscript evidence available. As there are so many differences between the manuscript families it is important that we are presented with the full picture, not just a partial picture:-

(1) The New King James’ (Authorised) Version of the Holy Bible (NKJV) with the separate Apocrypha (Old Testament Apocrypha or Deuterocanonical Books).

(2) The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) with expanded Apocrypha

(3) The Rotherhams Emphasised Bible.

(4) The Todays New International Version (TNIV).

(5) The King James Version (KJV) can be used as a comparison text where the NKJV can assist understanding of some of the Old English grammar in the KJV. It is claimed that there are in the region of 20,000 errors (i.e. spelling, grammatical and some basic translational mistakes - though also considered innocent!) in the KJV, most of these are corrected in the NKJV although the NKJV also possesses some inclusive language along with dozens of omissions and changes to the original text. 

(6) The Douay-Rheims bible is a Roman Catholic bible and should only be used as a comparison text and to help readings from Vatican I documents as some books are longer and several Apocryphal books are also included as canon; thus some VI liturgical references cannot be located in traditional bibles. E.G. There are 67 verses missing from the Book of Daniel in most other bibles between verses 3:23 - 24 appearing as verses 3:24 - 90 in the Douay-Rheims (which also throw verses 3:24 - 30 (3:91 - 3:97), 4:1 - 3 (3:98 - 100) and 4:4 - 4:37 (4:1 - 4:34) out of synchronization) accompanied by the comment:- 

“Chap. 3 Ver. 24. And they walked, &c. Here St. Jerome takes notice, that from this verse, to ver. 91, was not in the Hebrew in his time. But as it was in all the Greek Bibles, (which were originally translated from the Hebrew,) it is more than probable that it had been formerly in the Hebrew or rather in the Chaldaic, in which the book of Daniel was written. But this is certain: that it is, and has been of old, received by the church, and read as canonical scripture in her liturgy, and divine offices.”

All these bibles are detailed below... 

The Six Early Scriptural Source Texts
Most modern bibles, i.e. revised translations since 1821 contain something in the order of 300 omissions and amendments to the original texts and the original message of the bible is weakened by inclusive language, including: RSV, NIV, NASB and LB. It is also quite worrying that some texts (except for the Alexandrian Manuscript family) didn’t appear in the world until after the apostate heretical first ecumenical Council of Nicaea in 325 A.D. To obtain a complete picture of all the scriptural texts there are five source texts of the scriptures and we have to compare the best translations of all five; the source texts are as follows:- 

Alexandrian Manuscript Family Codex Vaticanus   Codex Sinaiticus   Byzantine Text (Also Majority, Constantinopolitan, Syrian, Ecclesiastical, or Received text) The Dead Sea Scrolls
215 - 254 A.D. 325 - 350 A.D. 330 - 350 A.D. 325 - 400 A.D. circa 150 B.C. - 61 A.D.
Compiled by Origen of Alexandria Rediscovered in the Vatican Library in 1844  Discovered at the Monastery of Saint Catherine, at the foot of Mount Sinai in Egypt in two parts in 1845 and 1859. This is the form of the Greek New Testament that is found in the largest number of surviving manuscripts.  Discovered between 1945 and 1956.
NIV, TNIV, NASB.

NB Most modern New Testament translations now use an Eclectic Greek text that is closest to the Alexandrian text-type.

Rotherhams, NWT, RV, IV, LB, ASV, LB, NC. Rotherhams, NWT, RV, IV, LB, ASV, LB, NC. KJV, NKJV, Latin Vulgate (Tyndale, Geneva, Douay-Rheims), JB, NJB, RV. NRSV.

 

RSV.

NRSV.

Biblical Canon"The Gospel" - A fragment of Mark
The Arian Catholic Church believes that the Books of I and II Enoch should belong with the Old Testament Apocrypha (currently being in the Pseudepigrapha); and the New and Old Testament Apocrypha including the additional texts from the Dead Sea Scrolls should both be readily available for all to examine with the Epistle of Barnabas and the Shepherd of Hermas from the Codex Sinaiticus and the Apocalypse of Peter being restored to the New Testament canon. Some Apocryphal books are not trusted by theologians however, whether they be canonical or not, they are of very great antiquity, and were appealed to by many of the ancient Christians, and while there is truth, even fragments of truth to be investigated and cross referenced, these should not be hidden away from society. NB The Gospel According to Mark in the New Testament is purported to be a canonical scripture by most Churches, however originally produced in the 40s A.D. it was subjected to a redaction in 75 A.D. to present Jesus more as a harmless pro-Roman who sided with the invaders. Originally titled: “The Gospel” it was re-titled: “The Gospel According to Mark” in the second century. Much of the books of the New Testament underwent numerous redactions, in particular the Gospel according to John, and most of the original scriptures and early transcripts were destroyed to ensure the survival of the redacted versions. Irenaeus at the end of the second century and Origen during the third century wrote about most of the books of the New Testament that would later become Canon, yet between them they expressed doubt as to the status of the following books:

It is difficult to know whether or not this was due to bias in the Pauline movement trying to suppress certain Jewish Christian writings such as of James the Just and other members of Jesus family (e.g. Jude and Matthew) but also was due to the nature of the redactions that had taken place and the pseudepigraphical nature of some of these books; e.g. it is believed that 2 Peter was not written by the same author as 1 Peter.

In the latter half of the third century Origen compiled the Alexandrian Manuscript Family. The table below compares how the Canonical books differed between different theologians. The grey boxes indicate Gospels and Epistles that were NOT included; Origen actually wrote about how he considered some Epistles NOT to be canon (blue boxes), and Irenaeus and Origen both appealed to certain Gospels which were not included into RC canon (yellow boxes)... 

Marcion of Sinope
(circa 85/110 - 160  A.D.)
Irenaeus
(circa 130 - 202 A.D.)
Origen
(b. 185 - d. circa 254 A.D.)
[compare Codex Sinaiticus (NT)]
Athanasius of Alexandria
(circa 293/6 - 2nd May 373 A.D.)
  Matthew Matthew Matthew
  Mark Mark Mark
Luke Luke Luke Luke
  John John John
  Acts Acts Acts
  Shepherd of Hermas Shepherd of Hermas  

Romans

Romans

Romans

Romans

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

Galatians

Galatians

Galatians

Galatians

Ephesians

Ephesians

Ephesians

Ephesians

Philippians

Philippians

Philippians

Philippians

Colossians

Colossians

Colossians

Colossians

1 Thessalonians

1 Thessalonians

1 Thessalonians

1 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians

 

1 Timothy

1 Timothy

1 Timothy

 

2 Timothy

2 Timothy

2 Timothy

 

Titus

Titus

Titus

Philemon

Philemon

Philemon

Philemon

 

 

Hebrews

Hebrews

 

 

James

James

 

1 Peter

1 Peter

1 Peter

 

 

2 Peter

2 Peter

 

1 John

1 John

1 John

 

 

2 John

2 John

 

 

3 John

3 John

 

 

Jude

Jude

    Epistle of Barnabas  
       

 

Revelation (Apocalypse of John)

Revelation (Apocalypse of John)

Revelation (Apocalypse of John)

In 325 A.D., there were over 300 Gospels available to the Christian World but the pro-Romans at the Council of Nicaea, with the support of the Roman Emperor (Constantine I), decided to accept the four gospels that now form part of the New Testament and burn the rest. This was however decided by a majority of votes against vehement opposition by the original Christians, and it was therefore made a penal offence to posses an unauthorised Gospel. 

The Hebrew Bible, the Old Testament and the Apocrypha
The Old Testament of the traditional Christian bible contains 39 books, these are the same as the 24 books of the Jewish Tanakh (comprising three sets of books: Torah (Law / Pentateuch), Nevi’im (Earlier & Later Prophets) and Ketuvim (Writings / Hagiographa)) although the order of the books is different and some books in the Christian OT are merged into fewer books in the Jewish Tanakh. Therefore the Hebrew Bible differs considerably from the arrangement and order of the Septuagint, which have been adopted by the Vulgate and the Protestant versions. The Torah contained the five books of Moses in the unvarying order of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The Nevi’im comprised the four books of the Earlier Prophets, in the unvarying order of: Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings; and the four books of the Later Prophets: Isaias, Jeremias, Ezechiel, Minor Prophets (all twelve counted as forming one book). The Ketuvim comprised the remaining eleven books, the poetical works, Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the five Megilloth, or Rolls (Canticle of Canticles, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecelesiastes, Esther), and finally Daniel, Esdras, Nehemias, Chronicles; twenty-four books in all.

Top of Page The Protestant Apocrypha and Roman Catholic Deuterocanonical books comprise the following books, the seven additional books in the Roman Catholic Old Testament canon are highlighted in bold (Some books are included within the texts of existing canonical books: 

Top of Page The following books appear in the Greek and Slavonic Bibles but not in the Roman Catholic Canon:

Top of Page The following books appear in the Slavonic Bible and in the Latin Vulgate appendix:

Top of Page The following book appears in the appendix to the Greek Bible:

The Arian Catholic Broader Canon includes all of the Deuterocanonical / Apocryphal texts from the Roman, Protestant, Greek and Slavonic bibles, which are found in the Greek Septuagint.

The terms: Hebrew Bible” or First Covenant” are preferred for the Hebrew Bible as its authority is recognised by the Church, whereas the term: Old Testament” implies that its authority has been superseded by the New Testament”; Jesus himself frequently referred to the Torah and spoke of its validity (e.g. Matthew 5:17-20). 

The Books of Enoch
The books of 1, 2 and 3 Enoch form part of the Pseudepigrapha where 1 Enoch 1:9 is referred to, and quoted, in Jude, 1:14-15. Most commonly, the phrase Book of Enoch refers to 1 Enoch, which is wholly extant only in the Ethiopic language. The currently known texts of this work are usually dated to Maccabean times (ca. 160s BC). The other two books named Enoch” are: 2 Enoch (surviving only in Old Slavonic, c. 1st century AD); and 3 Enoch (surviving in Hebrew, c. 5th-6th century AD). The numbering of these texts has been applied by scholars to distinguish the texts from one another.

Whilst these books do not form part of the Canon of Scripture for the mainstream Christian churches, various groups, including the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, regard parts or all of 1 Enoch to be inspired Scripture. Our belief is to reveal truth and therefore all the Holy Scriptures should be readily available. We feel that all the Books of Enoch should be represented and that 1 Enoch 1:6-11 (Part of the Book of Watchers) should be considered as canon as it is thought to have been the original core of that Book, around which the remainder was later added.

The Book of Enoch (1 Enoch)

1 Enoch consists of five quite distinct major sections:

  1. The Book of Watchers (1 Enoch 1 – 36)

  2. The Book of Parables (1 Enoch 37 – 71) (Also called the Similitudes of Enoch) 

  3. The Book of the Heavenly Luminaries (1 Enoch 72 – 82) (Usually abbreviated to The Book of Luminaries. Also called the Astronomical Book) 

  4. The Dream Visions (1 Enoch 83 – 90) (Also called the Book of Dreams) 

  5. The Epistle of Enoch (1 Enoch 91 – 108)

According to some recent scholars, these five sections were originally independent works, themselves a product of much editorial arrangement, and were only later redacted into what is now called 1 Enoch. However, this view is opposed by many scholars who maintain the literary integrity of the Book of Enoch.

The opening verses of The Book of Enoch tell us that the revelations in the book were not meant for Enoch’s generation, rather a remote generation, and of course the book would make more sense to the generations after Christ. We know that the early Church made use of The Book of Enoch, but it was then all but lost, until recent times (it was rediscovered in Ethiopia in 1773). It could be that this book was meant for our generation, (the generation of the fig tree) as it is becoming available again now, after being concealed for over 1,000 years.

Now that the Book has resurfaced it’s text is relatively pure, due to the fact it was untouched for more than 1,000 years. The Book of Jude 1:14-15 quotes 1 Enoch 1:9, therefore the Bible itself confirms the authenticity of this section of the book. 

The Book of the Secrets of Enoch (2 Enoch)

The Book of The Secrets of Enoch was found in Russia and Serbia and has been preserved only in Slavonic. It was written sometime at the beginning of the Christian Era. It was edited by a Greek and was written in Egypt. The Book of the Secrets of Enoch had a great influence on the writers of the New Testament. It explains and verifies some of the darker and more mysterious passages of the New Testament. The Book of the Secrets of Enoch was widely used by Christians in the early centuries.  The Secrets of Enoch is also referred to as “Slavonic Enoch” or “2 Enoch”.  There are a multitude of supernatural and paranormal events recorded in The Book of the Secrets of Enoch.

The Hebrew Apocalypse of Enoch (3 Enoch)

3 Enoch, or the Hebrew Apocalypse of Enoch, was supposedly written by Rabbi Ishmael the high priest after his visionary ascension into heaven (d. 132 AD). Although it contains a few Greek and Latin loan words, there is no reason to suspect that the original language of 3 Enoch was anything other than Hebrew. Whereas some of the traditions of 3 Enoch may be traced back to the time of Rabbi Ishmael, and even earlier, the date of composition is probably closer to the fifth or sixth centuries. It was probably written in or near Babylon. The book may be divided into the following four major parts:

  1. The ascension of Ishmael (chaps. 1-2); 

  2. Ishmael meets the exalted Enoch (chaps. 3-16); 

  3. A description of the heavenly household (chaps. 17-40); and 

  4. The marvels of heaven (chaps. 41-48).
        - Craig A. Evans, Noncanonical Writings and New Testament Interpretation, (1992) p. 24.

Composition of the Arian Catholic sponsored Bible: The Universal BibleThe Arianist Bible, in Goat-skin leather, with Gold Edging.

The Universal Bible will maintain the old English terminology and style while incorporating modern understanding of Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic, and addressing several mistakes made in the early translations. The work will be accompanied by a cross referencing section that will point out contradictions and mistakes whilst also highlighting corroborated texts. Where the texts of the Manuscripts differ, the different versions will be presented in parallel.

The Universal Bible will comprise three volumes:-

Pseudepigrapha & Non-Canonical Texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls

  • Including III Enoch

The Holy Bible - Broader Canon

  • The Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) (aka: Old Testament / First Covenant)

    • Torah (Teaching/Instruction/Law) (aka: Pentateuch (Five Containers))

    • Nevi’im (Prophets)

    • Ketuvim (Writings)

The New Covenant Apocrypha & Q (New Testament Apocrypha / Nag Hammadi)

  • Including the non-canonical texts of the Nag Hammadi

  • Pistis Sophia (comparing the different versions)

  • Gospel According to Judas

  • A reconstruction of the Q Gospel (Q1, Q2 and Q3).

There are electronic copies of many of these books (although they do use the modern translation) which are available by contacting us.

Parts of our own electronic Bible are also available, again using modern English and is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format (Version 6 compatible). For a copy please send a donation to our Arian Catholic Bible fund.

Mazarin bible 1455Recommended Bibles

There are therefore three main Bibles, one using each family of scriptures, plus a fourth bible that is the best translation that takes all the source texts (including the Dead Sea Scrolls) into account, and two further bibles that serve as support texts as their earlier translations of the Byzantine and Vulgate texts differ widely from modern translations; these bibles we would recommend for those wishing to study all the the available scriptural texts, you will find that there are distinct differences in their translations (some examples of the editions that have been published are given):

New King James Bible (NKJV), Compact Reference Edition - Nelson (31 December 1993) [ACC Rating: 7/10]
    Leather Bound
    ISBN: 0-8407-2959-6
Minister’s Bible-NKJV - Hendrickson Publishers (30 July 2006) [ACC Rating: 7.5/10]
    Leather Bound
    ISBN: 1-5985-6112-X

NKJV Study Bible - Nelson (August 2005) [ACC Rating: 7/10]
** Warning! - There is a trinitarian bias in the Bible Commentary but otherwise it is still good **
    Leather Bound
    ISBN: 0-7180-1564-9

New King James Version, Ministers Deluxe Bible - Hendrickson Publishers; Deluxe edition (31 March 2007) [ACC Rating: 8.5/10]
    Black Genuine Morocco Leather Bound
    ISBN: 1-5985-6114-6

-- 
NB Unfortunately the NKJV is not available with Apocrypha at the time of writing, as soon as a suitable edition becomes available it will be advertised here. Alternatively please see: KJV Apocrypha, King James Version (Authorised Version) with Apocrypha or New Revised Standard Version with Apocrypha (with three Additional Books).
-- 

Further Recommended Reading

The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha

The Old Testament Apocrypha or Deuterocanonical Books

The New Testament Apocrypha 

The "Chi Rho" symbol of the early church representing the first two Greek letters of "Christ" - Alpha and Omega pertain to Revelation 22:13 - "I am Alpha and Omega, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End."

The Arian Catholic Missal and Breviary

For all its services throughout the year the Arian Catholic Church uses Arianised extracts from three main sources...

This is because, in spite of the heresy of the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches, these versions of the Divine Liturgy contain elements of the early liturgies and, we believe have followed a similar development to that which would have occurred naturally in the Arian liturgy. We therefore edit these liturgies to remove deliberate references to the trinity and divinity of Christ.

1549 Book of Common Prayer (BCP 1549): The Arian Catholic Church uses Arian-Catholicised extracts from the 1549 Edition of the Book of Common Prayer. The 1549 Book of Common Prayer was still Catholic enough to pass muster as a legitimate variant of the Roman Catholic Rite and is still recognised by the Anglican Catholics. The American Edition of 1928 and Canadian Edition of 1962 contain the original 1549 text. No other editions of this book are authorised for use in the Arian Catholic Church with the exception of Arian-Catholicised extracts from the Ordination and Consecration of Deacons, Priests and Bishops in the 1552 (2nd Edition) and 1662 editions of the BCP.

The First English Prayer Book (BCP 1549)” Hardback with red dust jacket, 146 pages, with red rubrics. John Hunt Publishing ISBN: 0 85305 479 7. Price: £9.99. Size: 7" x 5" x 3/4". [Contents: Matins, Evensong, Holy Communion - 1549 Canon, Baptism, Confirmation (Chrismation), Matrimony, Visitation of the Sick, Burial of the Dead, Litany, Catechism* and Collects. NB: No Psalter or Lectionary. *This Catechism is not authorised by the ACC.]

Detailed information about the 1549 Book of Common Prayer can be found at http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/1549/BCP_1549.htm with many of the pages scanned to PDF for download and most available in html format.

Roman Catholic Daily Missal (Pre - Vatican II (Ante 1958)): The Arian Catholic Church also uses Arianised extracts from the pre 1958 version of the Roman Missal. This is because the Arian Catholic Church distances itself from compounded heresy of the Vatican II Roman Catholic sect (see Vatican II Compounded Heresy).

Title: The St Andrew Daily Missal
ISBN:  <Currently Unavailable!>
Publisher: St. Bonaventure Publications
Author: Dom Gaspar Lefebvre. O.S.B.
Format: Hard Cover
Publication Date: 1945, reprinted 1999
Pages: 1,900 - 2,000
H x W x D: 6 3/4" (17.1 cm) x 4 1/4" (10.7 cm) x 1 3/4" (4.44 cm)
Price: US$47.00, UK£29.50

Benedictine Breviary: Oblates and Clergy of the Arian Benedictine Order and Arian Catholic Church also use Arianised extracts from the Benedictine Breviary for their daily services and reading. 

Proposals for the Arian Catholic Missal and Breviary

Arian Catholic Missal: The Arian Catholic Church will, as soon as possible, produce its own Arian Catholic Missal that will combine all the rites and services of the AC Church using the appropriate Liturgical references and language. In the meantime, the Clergy, Oblates, Laity and Congregation, where necessary, are encouraged to obtain the BCP of 1549 and the St Andrew Daily Missal with guidelines which are available from the Arian Catholic Church on how to Arianise the prayers and services within these books.

Arian Benedictine Breviary: As soon as possible, the Arian Benedictine Order will produce its own Breviary for Oblates and Clergy. However, for the moment all Arian Catholic Clergy and Arian Benedictine Oblates will be issued with guidelines on how to “Arianise” the Benedictine Breviary.

Please support us in achieving this as best you can by sending a donation the the Arian Catholic Bible fundTop of Page

The "Chi Rho" symbol of the early church representing the first two Greek letters of "Christ" - Alpha and Omega pertain to Revelation 22:13 - "I am Alpha and Omega, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End."

Download the Liturgical Calendar ... http://ipriest.org.uk/calendar/

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